Research

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Scientists circle the Great White

Scientists circle the Great White

News Release University of Technology Sydney 14. August 2013 ———————– In summary: Sharks play a key role in the ocean’s ecology but populations are at risk from fishing and other factor Researchers are learning more about the predator by tagging and monitoring sharks at a nursery on Australia’s east coast It is hard to think

Study Finds ‘Ray’ Wings Sold to Consumers Include Vulnerable Species & Can be Mislabelled

Study Finds ‘Ray’ Wings Sold to Consumers Include Vulnerable Species & Can be Mislabelled

Genetic testing by DNA Barcoding, has revealed which species are sold under the commercial term ‘ray wings’ in Ireland and the UK. The blonde ray, given the lowest rating for sustainability in the marine conservation society’s good fish guide, was the most widely sold.

NOAA Fisheries: ‘The Science Behind’ Video Series

NOAA Fisheries: ‘The Science Behind’ Video Series

NOAA Fisheries When it comes to shark science, we have some of the top expertise in the country. From coast to coast, more than 40 scientists conduct research to support the conservation and management of 44 shark species in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. In fact, our Apex Predators Program is the oldest shark research

New funding for shark research in Nova Scotian waters

New funding for shark research in Nova Scotian waters

Dalhousie University’s Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) has been awarded funding from Encana Corporation to study blue sharks off the coast of Nova Scotia, and to train students in the capture, tagging and tracking of marine animals over the next two years.

Knowledge of stingrays’ sparked-up sex may help deter sharks

Knowledge of stingrays’ sparked-up sex may help deter sharks

Sexual attraction of the electric sort happens when stingrays meet, according to a researcher at The University of Western Australia's Oceans Institute - and the finding may help prevent shark attacks on humans.

Fear of sharks helps preserve balance in the world’s oceans

Fear of sharks helps preserve balance in the world’s oceans

A prey’s fear of a shark is critical to protecting ocean biodiversity, according to FIU researchers. Without this fear, a cascading effect within the ecosystem could destabilize the world’s oceans. Seagrass beds provide habitats for other fish and marine life — many of which people rely on. When predators, such as tiger sharks, rove in areas near seagrasses, herbivores...

Sharks worth more in the ocean than on the menu

Sharks worth more in the ocean than on the menu

Media Release The University of British Columbia 30. May 2013 ——————– Sharks are worth more in the ocean than in a bowl of soup, according to researchers from the University of British Columbia. A new study, published today in Oryx – The International Journal of Conservation, shows that shark ecotourism currently generates more than US$314

Research identifies snag in shark conservation

Research identifies snag in shark conservation

News Release Charles Darwin University 21. May 2013 ——————————– A case of mistaken identity for sharks found in Northern Territory waters could be preventing the conservation of some species from environmental change. Research by a Charles Darwin University postgraduate student has revealed the growing trend of pooling similar species in conservation strategies as insufficient to

Young Great White Sharks in So Cal Have High Contaminant Levels in Them

Young Great White Sharks in So Cal Have High Contaminant Levels in Them

The ocean off Southern California is a known birthing ground for great white sharks. It also holds toxic chemical concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the insecticide DDT that were dumped into coastal waters decades ago, especially off the Palos Verdes Peninsula.

Feeding habits of Ningaloo stingrays in the spotlight

Feeding habits of Ningaloo stingrays in the spotlight

News Release Murdoch University 06. May 2013 ——————— A new study has shed light on the diets and feeding habits of Ningaloo’s stingrays, information which has never been documented before. “As meso-predators, stingrays are an important link between the top and bottom of the food chain,” said Dr Owen O’Shea, of Murdoch University and the

New eco study looks at Great white shark behavior

New eco study looks at Great white shark behavior

In a new study published in PLOS ONE titled, "White sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) scavenging on whales and its potential role in further shaping the ecology of an apex predator," Captain Chris Fallows from Apex Expeditions collaborated with University of Miami (UM) scientists Dr. Neil Hammerschlag and Austin Gallagher, to explore the behaviors of Great white sharks scavenging on dead...

Shark tooth weapons reveal missing shark species in Central Pacific islands

Shark tooth weapons reveal missing shark species in Central Pacific islands

Press Release Public Library of Science 3-Apr-2013 19th c. shark tooth weapons reveal 2 shark species no longer native to Gilbert Islands The Gilbert Island reefs in the Central Pacific were once home to two species of sharks not previously reported in historic records or contemporary studies. The species were discovered in a new analysis

Scientists confirm first two-headed bull shark

Scientists confirm first two-headed bull shark

News Release Michigan State University March 25, 2013 Scientists have confirmed the discovery of the first-ever, two-headed bull shark. The study, led by Michigan State University and appearing in the Journal of Fish Biology, confirmed the specimen, found in the Gulf of Mexico April 7, 2011, was a single shark with two heads, rather than

New research shows white sharks have a larger appetite than originally thought

New research shows white sharks have a larger appetite than originally thought

A ground-breaking new study challenges popular assumptions about the feeding behaviour of the world's largest predatory fish, the white shark. The research, which has been published in the prestigious journal Scientific Reports, suggests that white sharks may have much higher energy needs than previously thought.

Mystery sharks off Rottnest shed new light on species

Mystery sharks off Rottnest shed new light on species

News Release The University of Western Australia 28. February 2013 ———————— The discovery of two sharks never seen before in Australian waters is set to re-write scientists’ understanding of the species. Shark biologist Ryan Kempster, of The University of Western Australia’s Oceans Institute, said the rare sharks were caught off Rottnest Island two years ago

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